Child Abuse

Parenting a Child Who has Experienced Trauma

parenting-a-child-who-has-experienced-traumaChildren who have experienced traumatic events need to feel safe and loved. All parents want to provide this kind of nurturing home for their children. However, when parents do not have an understanding of the effects of trauma, they may misinterpret their child’s behavior and end up feeling frustrated or resentful. Their attempts to address troubling behavior may be ineffective or, in some cases, even harmful. Click here to open.

Source: Child Welfare Information Gateway. (2014). Parenting a child who has experienced Trauma. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Parenting a Child Who Has Experienced Abuse or Neglect

parenting-a-child-who-has-experienced-neglect-or-abuse-myadoptedkid-comChildren who have been abused or neglected need safe and nurturing relationships that address the effects of child maltreatment. This factsheet is intended to help parents (birth, foster, and adoptive) and other caregivers better understand the challenges of caring for a child who has experienced maltreatment and learn about the resources available for support. Click here to open.

Source: Child Welfare Information Gateway. (2013). Parenting a child who has experienced abuse or neglect. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.